Home > Eye Protection, General > ANSI Z87 and Z87+… What’s the difference?

ANSI Z87 and Z87+… What’s the difference?

No, that little number Z87 on the inside of the arm of your safety glasses is not the part number (We get at least 2 or 3 calls a month from customers who give us the Z87 number, believing it to be the part number of the glasses that they are holding), it’s the number that lets you know that the glasses you are holding are rated and pass the Z87 standard from ANSI for eye protection.

You may have noticed, however, that recently the Z87 sometimes has a little “+” sign after it. What does that mean?

Since 2003, the ANSI Standard for eye protection began adding a new rating, or rather dividing the standard in two: high impact (Z87+) and basic impact (Z87).

Z87+ or High impact standard glasses must pass a much more stringent set of tests than the basic or Z87 impact standard.

Z87+ glasses must pass the “high mass” test which consists of dropping a 500 gram pointed weight from a height of about 5 feet onto the lens. It also must pass the test of having a ¼” steel ball shot at the lens. The velocity varies which the product (glasses = 102 mph from a distance of 150′, goggles = 170 mph from a distance of 250′ and 205 mph from a distance of 300ft).

The bottom line is that the high impact standard (the Z87+) offers much better protection. If you are going to wear eye protection it may certainly be worth your while to get the added protection.

About these ads
  1. Steve
    January 5, 2012 at 11:59 am

    What is the OSHA requirement or recommendation for safety gasses worn by tree trimmers over prescription glasses?

  2. deb
    January 26, 2012 at 3:47 pm

    are nemesis ANSI Z87.1+ OSHA approved glasses?

  3. January 26, 2012 at 6:02 pm

    Steve… there are no specific requirements specific to tree trimmers. As long as the glasses are ANSI certified and the prescription glasses aren’t glass lenses, you’re fine.

    Deb… Yes, if an OSHA inspector comes through your facility he’s going to be looking for the ANSI marking on the safety glasses. OSHA doesn’t set the standard, ANSI does so OSHA looks for the ANSI approval.

  4. Anonymous
    September 26, 2012 at 5:53 am

    ” The velocity varies which the product (glasses = 102 mph from a distance of 150′, goggles = 170 mph from a distance of 250′ and 205 mph from a distance of 300ft).”

    What difference does it make how far away the projectile is, when it’s fired? All that matters is the IMPACT speed. You could fire Projectile A from 50 light years away and Projectile B from 1 inch away, and if both projectiles are traveling at the same speed when they hit the test material, that’s all that matters.

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 51 other followers

%d bloggers like this: